Judgement Day

Yesterday was full of surprises bringing First Light Flashback to the staff of the John Joseph Moakley U.S. District Courthouse in Boston, MA.  It was such an honor to be chosen as their premier speaker, making the debut of a live presenter for their Native American Heritage Month commemoration.  Upon entering the facility, it was a relief to have prior approval for cell phone or electronic devices awaiting arrival at the security checkpoint. Their staff was also kind enough to make necessary arrangements for a war club to accompany the other items needed for the performance. Unbeknownst to the unsuspecting audience. Many of which were judges or security personnel.

It's safe to say however, all staff in attendance were startled when out came a knife during the introduction of the initial character (1491), who himself was unaware if the audience was friend or foe.  As if the language barrier during such times was not challenging enough for many audience members, it made quite the impression of what would become First Encounter for First Peoples of Turtle Island.  Fortunately the stone knife made it's way through the metal detector safe & sound to help deliver the impact needed to step back into a time when cultures clashed.  No audience members were harmed during the presentation of course.

Many were easily set at ease following the awkward circumstances of arriving in a new world while trying to determine what language to speak. Laughs filled the room as we became familiar with one another, our languages, our customs.  Not to say the performance wasn't filled with emotions however.  Taking on the role of King Phillip demands the attention of anyone in attendance.  Digging deep into their souls, being reminded of the events that became known as America's First Thanksgiving, it's origins & of course the unfortunate demise of that particular character.

Fortunately for most, the whaling period allowed us to end on a more positive note.  Promoting awareness of the many great contributions Native Americans not only made in this country, however the many places they traveled throughout the world. With so many ongoing relationships established around the globe, many fortunes made, many stories shared. During the era of Moby Dick & those who heard that tale from our ancestors oral recitals while at sea, such a proud history was not only shared, each member of the audience was able to leave having lived these experiences firsthand.  After careful deliberation, it's safe to say, the jury is in.  Another fine example of time travel through a vessel we like to call "First Light Flashback".

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